Analytics and Reporting

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Analytics and Reporting

Analytics and reporting gives you a window on the success of your websites conversions. Audit My Website are specialists who will help analyse factors that would otherwise hinder your customers to help ensure your website converts as much traffic as possible.

Website Audits, SEO Services

Our complete all-in-one website audit includes code reviews, SEO audits and … to ensure the optimum health of your website

  • We will review your website at a code level and report on performance and content quality

  • Over 100 quality checks made and verified

  • Inform you where the issues may lie and how they can be fixed

  • Quality website audit from only £599 + VAT

  • Money back guarantee if we cannot find any issues upon your site

 Call us on 0161 300 8150 or email hello@auditmywebsite.co.uk

Website Audits in Manchester - Audit My Website, SEO Service and Performance Benchmarking
Do you offer a money back guarantee? 2017-06-16T13:46:25+00:00

Yes! If we cannot find any issues with your website, then we will refund you in full.

How much does this all cost me? 2017-06-16T13:40:03+00:00

Our standard website audit costs only £799£599 + VAT (special offer price)

We also have a range of add-ons to suit your requirements:

Expedited process: +£250. Standard turnaround time is 5-7 days, the expedited reduces this to 36 hours

Competitor ranking: +£150. We will take upto 5 competitor websites and see how you rank against them

Backlink reporting: +£150. We will perform backlink checks so you can see who is linking back to your site

Source code review (Microsoft code only): +£750. This allows us to perform low level source code review of your sites core to see if best practices have been observed.

We will provide the report as a downloadable PDF and call you to discuss in more detail. A hard copy can also be provided upon request.

Can you fix stuff as well that you identify? 2017-06-16T13:37:14+00:00

In most cases absolutely yes. We say in most cases as there are always the exceptions to this rule. We will outline all the issues we find and put forward a proposal for us to address them for you along with how urgent they are so you can prioritise accordingly.

What do you need to get started? 2017-06-16T13:37:20+00:00

You can order direct from our website and pay securely online. Alternatively we can invoice you directly, just let us know what is best.

We will need obviously the URL of the website to audit, administrative logins for the site, keyword lists you are ranking for, competitor url’s, access to source code and thats pretty much it.

Once we have cleared payment, we then can start the website audit and will be in touch within the following week to discuss the findings..

Do I really need an audit of my website? 2017-06-14T16:16:32+00:00

Answer: Highly likely.

Websites are notoriously complex animals that do need nurturing to get the most out of them. Many clients invest thousands of pounds upon their site and then expect it to sit there and work away. What they don’t realise is that search engines update their algorithms regularly, things break, technologies change, errors creep in, pages get slower and more.

Our website audit process is designed to help you identify any issues and help you develop a plan of action in order to fix them once and for all.

Performance Reporting

Performance Reporting

Your sales team fight in the trenches to win new business, while your marketers piece together intelligence from this that will direct their efforts efficiently and effectively. That is the hope, anyway. Because better quality information means better decision making. Bridging this gap of reporting and analysis in a meaningful way can prove to be a real challenge.

Here we will guide you through some of the key points that will ensure you have both helpful and effective business performance reporting practices in place that will help you closely monitor and achieve meaningful goals.

Choosing Effective KPI’s and Setting the Right Goals

Key performance indicators (KPI’s) are measurable values which demonstrate how successful an organisation has been at reaching targets. They can be tied to pretty much any metric that gives a good and reliable indication of success or failure of a process. Sales metrics and KPI’s for instance, may help inform the marketing department as to how well the current campaign by the sales team is going. SEO metrics and KPIs may help indicate whether your online marketing efforts are attaining the desired level of visibility and traffic.

Choosing the right KPI is also important. It would be easy to monitor and chase ‘vanity’ numbers such as how many contact form enquiries you had on a particular week, or how many retweets you received. But these would be meaningless if they didn’t also take into account whether these interactions resulted in a sale.

Agreeing attainable goals are also important to staff morale: targets that are too difficult to realistically achieve will likely have a detrimental impact. Similarly, setting goals that are too easy might result in laziness, complacency or lack of focus. As with all parts of business reporting, it’s worth re-visiting this periodically to monitor the effectiveness of any existing system.

Using Visualisations Effectively

Visualising data in the form of graphs and charts can be a highly effective way of communicating complex data in an intuitive and easy to understand fashion. They can also be good for both identifying and highlighting specific patterns and trends which may emerge.

This effective communication of data is vital, since part of the reporting gap we highlighted at the start can depend on one department within your company communicating with another.

With more people able to interpret the information, further opportunities may emerge that help to highlight also lead to further opportunities to refine and filter the data to help tease out any other factors.

Web Analytics

Web Analytics

With a retail environment, it’s easy to see how customers behave; their general flow, leading to ‘hotspots’ and visibilities of particular product placements, thereby allowing the company to decide how to present the store. However, with a website you can’t see your visitors at all, so something more is called for in order to allow you the same insights.

In 2005, Google rolled out their own version of Google Analytics, using technology from their previously acquired Urchin Software Corp in April 2005. This included a lot more detail than a lot of other tracking software of this time and it has continued to become more feature rich to this day. This is a technology we include on all websites we build today.

In this post, we will cut through the technical terms to explain what each area actually does and will detail how these can be used effectively to give you ideas you can use to develop and enhance your digital marketing campaign.

Goal Tracking

Goal tracking is a useful technique which helps to identify important factors that determine the likelihood of a visit turning into an enquiry. By setting up a ‘goal’ you are telling the analytics what action you consider to be a ‘success’. If you run an online shop, this may be completing the checkout phase (i.e. entering credit card information and completing the purchase), or may simply be completing a contact form, or downloading a brochure or something similar. You can have as many goals as you wish and these can be tied to almost anything that happens once a visitor is in your site.

Doing this, opens up a new possibility: you can then analyse the data collected, filter by those that reached the goal, and work back to how they initially entered the site, what their path through the site was and all other information which helps identify any patterns or factors which may have contributed to this goal being reached. This can also be tied in to your other business reporting as part of your marketing automation efforts.

For instance, doing this may highlight that visits following links from your Twitter account and twice as likely to result in an enquiry, or that people looking for a product A are much more likely to buy on their visit than people looking for product B. Once you have these kinds of insights you can then update your website to reflect this: if people looking for product A are much more likely to enquire, is it worth having a banner advert on each page leading people directly to this product?

Split Testing ( A/B testing )

This is a new technique that appeared as a result of highly developed web analytics and is most useful when used on landing pages. By preparing two versions of a landing page, users can be delivered randomly to version 1 or version 2. Their behaviour is then closely measured using analytics to identify which version of this page has the highest conversion rate.

By repeating this test to tease out each factor that influences behaviour, understanding the customers behaviour better means you can improve the conversion rate of the landing page itself.

Funnels

Once you have set up goals, funnels allow you to get even more detail on the path the visitor took before reaching the goal. These could be (for instance) arriving on the homepage, clicking ‘about product A’ then a page ‘buy product A’. By defining each of these pages as funnel steps, you can then analyse the ‘drop-off’s’ and ‘exit pages’ where people did not follow the beaten path we were expecting. This can highlight optimisation opportunities to make it more obvious how to navigate this path.

Funnels can also be used to produce nice visualisation which illustrates the flows and drop-offs at each step helping you address any of the common reasons or places people do not enquire.

Page Load Speed

Also referred to as ‘page load time’, page load speed is a measure of the amount of time taken between the moment a user requests a web page to when this page is loaded in the users browser.  The quicker the website is, the better the user experience and the more likely you are to be ranked higher as a result.

In April 2010, Google announced that page load speed would be used as an important ranking signal, putting a bit more pressure both on website owners and developers to see if we can deliver a faster web experience. So what does this involve? What can you do to improve the speed of your website pages if you are concerned they aren’t running as quickly as they should?

Fortunately, there are also lots of useful tools to help analyse and test the speed of pages, while also offering some insight into how improvements might be made. Google Page Speed Tool and YSlow are two good (free) services. Most web browsers will come with a developer panel most of which include a ‘network’ tab – here the browser will detail (in sequence) what loaded, and how long it took and this can be another way to identify which bits of the page load quickly, which load slowly and where improvements can be made!

There are really two sides to consider when looking to improve page load speed:

Server Side Solutions

To begin delivering the requested web page, the server must first get it together! If you run a content management system (such as WordPress or Umbraco) this will involve reading the page’s data (and content) from a database or some kind of cache and putting this into a template which is then served as the final page. This means that page load speed in this first instance will depend on the quality of the website’s code, how streamlined and well optimised it runs and how easily it can obtain the information it needs for the page.

Some pages may require so much data, they will always be slow due to the amount of work needed from the computer. Consider a news website in which users post news articles. On this site it lists the latest 10 publications on the homepage. To update this, the website will need to (1) Check every news item ever posted  (2) order these by date published (3) take the top 10 of this list to display.

It isn’t easy or feasible to limit the scope of this query, since it will need to check everything, and in these scenarios it would be best to employ some kind of server-side caching, which basically involves simply ‘keeping a copy’ of the result the last time this was run.

The other way server side speeds can be improved is by simply adding more and better resources. Using a server with a faster processor and more memory will likely result in a site with pages that load a lot faster. Similarly, if you are currently using a shared hosting account, these will typically be a slower experience (shared hosting is a server with many websites hosted on it, so the availability of it will determined by how heavily other people’s websites are used too.). These shared hosting accounts tend to be slower than your own virtual private server or dedicated server, however having your own server ads to the costs considerably.

Load balancing involves having extra redundancy of resources so that the workload can be managed across all, rather than just one of those resources. For instance, it’s common for big websites to have load balanced databases; which means having at least two databases and setting the website up to decide, based on the level of usage at that moment, which database it will use for the current request.

Client Side considerations

Once the server has assembled and sent the finished web page to you, there will be several new things your browser will now need to do as a result of this. These include:

  • Loading all Javascript and CSS and other assets referenced by the page
  • Fetching each image upon the page
  • Rendering and display the page
  • Initialising and running the scripts contained within the page

To make things even more complicated, there will be some interdependency between these tasks, but not necessarily any sequential order developers can rely on. Whilst the loading of images may begin immediately, the page may start displaying before these have finished loading – with images being shown a split second or so later. The browser will make a lot of on-the-fly decisions very quickly when managing this process, but there are areas that can help to improve page load speed:

    • Encourage heavier browser caching of images – Since the image Url’s are not likely to change, many will recommend using heavy client-side caching. This can be achieved in a number of ways: generally this is done through HTTP headers but there are many other methods. If using Apache, this can be done via the .htaccess file (or php.ini), if using Microsoft IIS this can be done through the web.config file. By setting the maximum age of cache for images to something high (such as several days) you can seriously reduce the workload needed by the browser between pages.
    • Bundling and minifying Javascript – while this is technically a server-side feature, the browser will reap the benefit. Imagine loading a web page with 20 separate Javascript files – each would need to be loaded with 20 separate web request’s, one for each file, along with the first request for the page itself. This is a serious amount of legwork for the browser, by gathering all CSS into a single file and JS down into another file, you have reduced this down into 2 additional requests besides the page itself. Minifying this by removing spaces and any unnecessary text also further reduces the amount of work needed to send these across the web, however some code cannot be minified so ensure you backup and test fully before going ahead – nothing worse than finding you site not looking great and no backup to revert to!

 

  • Optimising images by reducing their size to the maximum usable size on your website, and also turning up compression can significantly reduce the file size of files and therefore the amount of work (and time) needed to serve them.

 

Each website’s requirement will be unique and while some websites may include many images (making it most important they are well optimised) some websites may have  fewer images, some may include more scripts, making it important to keep an open mind when profiling a website and checking for bottlenecks in the page load process.